Triglycerides

07/11/2016

Triglycerides are a source of energy for your body. They’re made from carbohydrates and fats. Triglycerides are an important part of staying healthy, but too many can raise your risk of heart disease, kidney disease, diabetes, and pancreatitis.

How do I know if my triglyceride levels are healthy?

Health care professionals measure your triglyceride levels by taking a sample of your blood after you haven’t eaten for 12 hours. Normal triglyceride levels range from 50mg/dL to 150mg/dL.

  • 50mg/dL - 199mg/dL. Borderline high.
  • 200mg/dL - 499mg/dL. High.
  • More than 500mg/dL. Very high.

If your triglyceride levels are higher than 150mg/dL, talk to your doctor about how to improve. He or she may recommend changing your diet, working out more, and avoiding alcohol. You may also be prescribed medication.

How can I maintain a healthy triglyceride level?

Health care professionals measure your triglyceride levels by taking a sample of your blood after you haven’t eaten for 12 hours. Normal triglyceride levels range from 50mg/dL to 150mg/dL.

  • Exercise regularly. If you’re overweight, focus on losing weight.
  • Don’t drink alcohol.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Relax. Make time for things you enjoy.
  • Eat more vegetables.
  • Eat less sugar and refined carbohydrates. These include white bread, white rice, and sweets.
  • Eat more whole grains.
  • Medication, if prescribed by your doctor.

For more information on triglycerides, contact your health care provider or visit the American Heart Association